Happy Feast of Dedication!

“Choose ye this day whom ye shall serve…”

https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=1+Maccabees+2&version=DRA&interface=amp

The story of the eight nights of oil is the most recognized reason for Hanukkah, but the history is far deeper. The “abomination of desolation” shown to the Prophet Daniel (Chapter 12) had a fulfillment under the King Antiochus Epiphanes, and foreshadows the abomination of desolation to come in the Last Days. The full account of Hanukkah is gory and heart-wrenching, which is probably why so much of the celebration is redirected to the rabbinical tradition of the oil. However, only when you recognize the extent of the evil can you appreciate the principles and righteousness of the protagonists. The account in I and II Maccabees shows the importance of loyalty, religious liberty, and trusting in YHWH’s strength when the fight is impossible to win.

The Maccabean revolt against Antiochus is an inspiration to stand for the Truth and our covenant with the Almighty, against the abominations and lies of the world, cleansing our temples in which His Spirit resides, and Dedicating ourselves to His purpose. 
We don’t have to stress with “must have” decorations, extra spending, and propping up fables of a red-suited man. We can simply gather together, learn about our history, and inspire our children with real-life heroes and the Light of the World!
Festival of Lights, Feast of Dedication, Chanukah, Hanukkah – may it be full of family, joy, love, thanksgiving, and Shalom!

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Does it Get Easier?

Overwhelmed mothers all over the social media groups ask for affirmation that their current troubles will improve. “My twins are four months. Please tell me it gets easier?!” 

Well. . . Not really.  There is a major trade-off for every improvement in parenting. You’ll be able to do housework once the baby can go four hours between feedings, but there will still be more work than you can complete. Babies won’t need to be carried everywhere forever. You’ll merely have to chase them down all day.  The child will learn to vocalize his needs, but then you must consistently monitor and correct mean and disrespectful attitudes behind the words. Little ones grow to care for their own physical needs, but they require your wisdom on complicated and deeply emotional matters.


Apply this to parenting, but also work, marriage, grief, faith, skill, lessons, health — life doesn’t get easier; you get stronger. The seasons change, but with every improvement of your situation, there will be a regression of some sort, another pressure to endure. Like the winds on a mighty cedar tree, our circumstances may stir or bend us. They do not cease, but we grow in strength.

“The righteous one flourishes like a palm tree, He grows like a cedar in Leḇanon. Those who are planted in the House of יהוה Flourish in the courts of our Elohim. They still bear fruit in old age; They are fresh and green, To declare that יהוה is straight, My rock, and in Him is no unrighteousness.”

‭‭Tehillim (Psalms)‬ ‭92:12-15‬ ‭TS2009‬‬

Dear Mama, You can Conquer this Mountain 

Laundry. Mount Washmore. The never-ending chore.

Laundry! Once so clean in the moonlight!

Folded neatly and stacked tight;

It was beautiful then.

But the family must work and play and soil it and then,

I do the laundry, Yet again! 

(Set to the tune of “Memory” by Andrew Lloyd Webber)

Did you know that there is a hidden joy to laundry? Did you know that you can look in your hamper and smile? Did you know that it is possible to stroll through your house and not find a chair heaped with clean clothes? Did you know that you can go weeks without hearing your husband say that he’s out of clean socks? That all of this can be accomplished on autopilot? And even a toddler can help?

A load a day keeps Mt. Washmore away.

That’s it. Only handle one load of laundry every day. Sort, wash, dry, fold, iron, and put away one load – and stop.

Starting this method is the hardest part, but once you have managed to keep it up almost every day for two weeks, the clothes begin to behave themselves.

What does this even look like? FlyLady and Diane taught me how. Especially if you are a visual learner like myself, I recommend looking through Diane’s “Morning Routine.”

As for my own laundry routine, I try to avoid this chore on Sabbath, and I try not to start until I have fed the infants and gotten dressed for the day. Only then do I grab the dirty clothes basket in my bedroom and take it to the laundry room. There, I sort clothes into my lovely set of hampers that we received as a baby shower gift.


The bags are removable. So, if someone is taking my laundry to wash whilst I recover from illness or  childbirth, they can simply grab a bag on their way out. If my own machines are being repaired, the bags are easier to transport to the laundromat than baskets. Yes, I love this thing!

 

By “laundromat” I mean the closest neighbor who will permit my use of their equipment.

Anyways. I am the only one in the house who sorts things into the proper hamper, but that’s okay. Daughter throws her clothes into the hamper closest to the door, so I made that bag the children’s hamper. Husband throws one outfit at a time on top of my sorting system, so that takes maybe three seconds to sort out every day. No sweat. Whichever hamper is fullest I dump into the washer, start it, and then I get on with my morning.

Sometime before lunch, I have Daughter help me switch the laundry from the washer to the dryer. The most fun part for her is in the afternoon. My toddler loves shoving the clean basket into the laundry room, dragging out the clean clothes, cleaning out the lint, fishing out the wool balls (fabric softener), shutting the door by herself, and shoving the clean clothes away to be folded.

Then, Daughter can put some of the little items away for me as I’m folding. Once everything is folded, I finish putting away the laundry that Daughter is still too short to manage. Nearly anything I can put on a hanger, goes on a hanger, so all the shirts, skirts, nice pants, and onesies fall to me. Since it’s only one load, though, a little effort gets it done easy. “All done!” we say. “Let’s have a chocolate!”

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I am paranoid about dressers toppling on my adventurous climbers, and I like the ability to find clothes quickly. So, I keep a hanger on the child’s closet door for all the onsies, shirts, or dresses. Pants and socks fit into a light storage basket with the diapers and wipes.

 

Grab an oblong hanger off one of those gift blankets from Baby’s shower, and snap the onesies on it in plain sight. 

Keep an empty diaper box by the crib. Once you realize your child has outgrown a garment, throw it in the box. When it gets full, tape the box shut, label it, then stow it away or give it away.

Helping me with chores has given my daughter a good sense of accomplishment, and I enjoy having her company. I also notice our communication skills get stronger as we work together. Her help certainly saved me a great deal of teeth-grinding agony when I was pregnant with twins and unable to bend or twist.

Our little balls of energy are ready to play games with us to learn how to run their own lives one day. Age appropriate responsibility can help tone down sour attitudes, believe it or not. Have fun teaching them early, while the mundane chores are still fun for them to master.
There you go. That’s the way I keep the laundromonster in check and have some fun teaching my little one while we do it together. Check out those links above. This method is adaptable to people who work outside the home, or work odd shifts, too. With a little change in attitude, you can do this!

How I fold and put away sheets. Disclaimer: This method has not been approved by anyone’s Aunt Mirna. My camera’s microphone is defective, so please bear with the audio quality.

Daddy Fix It

Many Scriptures make better sense when you’re rearing children. “To have faith like a child,” used to sound like pretending that the pain doesn’t exist, or to remove our negative reactions and try to restore our former ignorance. 

Now, I see my daughter. No matter what goes wrong, what is broken, or how badly something has been damaged, she responds with a happy, “Daddy fix it.” The clothes washer was out of balance, the toilet didn’t refill, a hairband snapped. Her instant reaction remained, “Uh oh!…Daddy fix it.” 

Now, the washer had to go to a repair shop. The toilet filled on its own. The hairband was thrown away. She still relies on Daddy to fix anything, simply because he does fix the majority of our broken things.

How much more can we rely on the Heavenly Father?

When relationships are at an impasse, Abba fix it. 

Money gets tight. Abba fix it. 

Hearts break. Abba fix it. 

Loved ones are lost. Abba fix it. 

Evil increases. Abba fix it.

We don’t know what to do. Abba fix it.

We don’t know when, or by what means He will heal us and put things right. There is no need to force our own solutions as Abraham’s wife, Sarah, did. With the faith of a child, we can still smile and be satisfied that by the end of time Abba will fix it.